Canopy shelter

by Ashley
(Spokane Valley, Washington)

You don't need much

You don't need much

For making a shelter, you don't need anything beside a knife, faith, hope, and god.

If you are near any trees with pine needles or lots of leaves, break some branches down. Make a pile, then take your knife, and skin the tree. You can make twine from the tree, to tie together your shelter.

Find some low branches, that you can tie things too. Get some of your branches you broke down, start tying them together and making a canopy. Its a shelter =] easy to make too. Do it by two trees, that is the best way. =] Good luck!




Be a wilderness survivor, not a wilderness victim.





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Bedding!?
by: Anonymous

You forgot the bedding! That is THE most important part of a shelter! Even if the ground is covered in pine needles, a thin layer of decomposing matter will do almost nothing to keep you warmer. There should be at least 6 inches of bedding in a shelter (in my experience)if you want to avoid hypothermia at night. Try a different approach and build the bedding as the first part of your shelter. That will put it all in perspective, and let you gauge how your frame should be built.
One last thing: you mentioned God in your list of materials. I am not anti-religion or anti-God or anything, but putting your fate "in the hands of God" will put you in a passive mindset, which can be fatal.

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The problem with canopy and lean-to shelters
by: Anonymous

The problem with this type of shelter is that there is, for the most part, little insulation. It can keep you fairly dry, but all heat will escape. This can be a serious problem, especially at night, when hypothermia can set in quickly. Sure, they're easy to make, but in a temperate, subarctic, or arctic climate, it is not very wise.
There are solutions, however. Building additional walls around you helps trap heat, and piling on a lot of extra insulation in the form of leaf litter or tree boughs always helps you stay both warm and dry. Fire does a lot for keeping you warm too.
But I must say: in cold conditions, build a different shelter, preferably a warmer one, such as a debris hut or dugout shelter. It takes more work, but pays of big-time in a survival situation.

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Tipis
by: Anonymous

We were just talking about making your own Tipis on http://www.preparedsociety.com

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