Proven Car Survival Kit

by P.J.C.
(Upstate NY)


You should add a roll of paper towels minimum, 2 or more heavy duty tow straps, a 2-ton come-along, an axe, youth size will do, a wood fired hobo stove, fire starters-a few cotton puffs coated with vaseline are compact and work well, and at least 2 Bic lighters to the auto survival list.

Directions to make a hobo stove are on line. You will need the stove to melt the snow for water, and some way to light it.

The axe is to clear trees and limbs from the road, or to roughen an icy surface for traction.

The rest should be self-explanatory.

Putting on tire chains in 2 foot of snow is hell, but I carry them with bungees to secure them to the tire.

This may seem excessive but I have used this stuff on Interstates as well as in remote areas, and roads in between. Remember the old cliche: "It's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it".

Ben

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Military surpluss ammo can

by Brock Jensen
(Utah)

I found that the military ammo cans are extremely useful to use for the car, and easily carried by most people. You can put plenty of things in there for potential emergencies, and it fit in any car.

Pick the right car emergency kit

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A couple of car emergency kit ideas

by Michael
(Minnesota)

A couple of years ago I was able to produce some heat using a couple of candles in a 1# coffee can which really made a difference in the car to keep it lit and less cold.

I also had a large pair of wool socks that I was able to wear because my dress shoes were not going to pull it off.


Site Build It!

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Survival kit for your car

by Mike
(Texas)

These are items specific to repairing your car. A plug type flat repair kit would work for numerous kinds of vehicle tires, but a thermostat or a hose or belt is not a "one size fits all" replacement part.



A serpentine belt, (used on most late model cars) a thermostat, and the two main hoses for your radiator would not take up much space in your kit, and it might mean the difference between spending a cold night on the side of the road and sitting by your fireplace in your den.

If you're not mechanically inclined, you might want to consider a repair manual your specific vehicle. These can be found at most automotive parts stores (NAPA, Auto Zone, etc.) for less that $20.00.

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skeeter

by Dennis
(Kansas City)

My car travel kit includes:

- Trail bars, raisins and some of last seasons small Halloween candy bars.

- Two dehydrated meals of choice and 8 bottles of water.

- Flint/steel fire starter and a windproof lighter and a baggie of dryer lint.

- An emergency tube tent, 2 large plastic trash bags and a couple of large space blankets.

- Two pair of gloves, stocking cap, a fleece jacket and 2 pairs of wool socks.

- A compass, flashlight and fishing kit with small baits brings up the rear. Spare batteries and led light, cell phone and spare batteries.

- 50' of parachute chord, whistle and signal mirror are welcome to my survival kit.

- A small frame, large caliber pistol and 2 spare mags is the handgun choice for confrontations but mainly for fighting my way to a AR15 rifle. A Glock 36 and AR 15 provide the firepower.

- Another must is to keep my truck fueled up and ready to get out in the event it becomes necessary.

- A few army surplus blankets and weather radio.

Time constraints dictate your ability to load up with can goods, extra ammo and clothing in a pinch. The more prepared in advance, the easier it is to add a few extras as you head out. Rx
meds, first aid kit and a good pair of binoculars are invaluable.

Hope we never need it.

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Gas tank

by Greg Ernst
(United States)

A good advice is to keep your tank at least half full at all times during the cold months. It provides a margin of error for the times when you inevitably encounter the unexpected.

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Overlooked Items

by Tim"NOMAD"Piper
(Louisville,KY&THE ROAD)

Depending on where you live it may not be legal to have a large knife in your vehicle. You may be able to carry an axe or hatchet instead as it is a tool. A knife is too but the police may argue that it is a weapon. The axe could be more compact by shortening the handle. The head is heavier and with the longer handle it will do a better job than a light hatchet.

I read where HOCKEY TAPE is better for first aid uses. They said that it works when wet. Other items are baby wipes,work gloves and automotive fuses.

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Handheld radio

by Jon
(United States)

How about including a compass and handheld radio (cb or ham) in the winter car survival kit? Anyone have any opinions on it or experience using it? Are they reliable and do they do good work?

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Coffee can

by Dave Harden
(United States)

Toilet paper is a small one that is overlooked. How about this one for supplemental heat. Coffee can, Roll of toilet paper and rubbing alcohol, lighter.

The toilet paper acts as a wick and absorbs the excess alcohol, the alcohol burns clean. You can use the can to hold the contents. The can lid can pur out the flames.

I learned this from the Colorado Division of Wildlife.

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Supplements for a good Car Kit

by Jeff W
(Branson Mo)

I think the objects the site listed to have in your car are great and are all included in my own car survival kit along with a few other things I'd like to share.

1) A "stick oven" mine is made from an old coffee can I cut the top out of, then filled the bottom 4 inches with sand and reattached the top metal part to the new bottom for insulation, you can use little things like twigs and broken branches to keep your car warm for hours with little effort or need of some heavy item like a saw or an axe.



2) Everyone has heard of the flashlights that never need batteries, the ones you just wind up for a minute and then have light for twenty, well there is another version that also includes a weather radio and a cell phone charger, all without ever having to worry about changing batteries. Along with it I keep an adapter along with a prepaid cell phone that I know fits the flashlight/charger so in a worst case scenario I can keep up to date on the weather and call for help if I need it.

3) Teabags, they take up close to no space and can be stored for a VERY long time along with your other equipment. A little thing like tea can help take your mind off the situation and calm nerves.

Thats it I hope this all helps you folks out!

-Jeff. W-

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