Fire making techniques

by Peter.R
(Australia)


I highly recommend everyone learn how to make a fire without any equipment. This will be a skill for life, and means that you will almost always (with the right conditions, and natural equipment available) be able to get a fire going. I would recommend such techniques as; the hand-drill and the bow-drill, as they both require next to no equipment except for wood and a piece of string or natural fibres in the case of the bow-drill.

If you want to be a true survivor, you should learn how to survive in the wild with NO man-made equipment. Because in a lot of cases survivors are't left with any gear whatsoever e.g plane crash. Further information is available on many different websites, and in any good survival manual. I will keep posting so stay tuned for more tips.


Start to prepare your trip before you head for the trails!

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thanks guys
by: Peter.R

yea i agree with both of you comments, thanks for the kind words. I love that Native American saying. I also forgot to add to my page that, if you know you are going to be going into the wilderness or close to it. It is essential to be prepared, in order for your survival. but again it is extremely useful to know what your doing without any gear.

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amen
by: Shaykh Idris

Be prepared1 indeed1 Know how to make cordage, how to male & use fire; [bigger the fire, the bigger the fool] I carry a small kit always: leatherman micro , led light, lighter, string, in a zipped leather purse on a chain that locks onto my belt-stay. However, I do know how to make more string, how to set a snare or to catch fish, the importance of a windbreak, and I always carry water. Food is a secondary natter, if one is getting un-lost. A knowledge of the terrain, before going in is useful: maps are only useful while they can be read from. Compass; if you know the local variation & deviation; but there are several ways of seeing direction. eg the moon always tilts towards the equator; everything rises eastward & sets westward. shadow stick: bisect the two points where the shadow cuts a circle centred on the stick; from there, through the stick,is toward the equator. Sit & think, it beats thrashing about like a fish out of water.

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amen
by: Shaykh Idris

Be prepared1 indeed1 Know how to make cordage, how to male & use fire; [bigger the fire, the bigger the fool] I carry a small kit always: leatherman micro , led light, lighter, string, in a zipped leather purse on a chain that locks onto my belt-stay. However, I do know how to make more string, how to set a snare or to catch fish, the importance of a windbreak, and I always carry water. Food is a secondary natter, if one is getting un-lost. A knowledge of the terrain, before going in is useful: maps are only useful while they can be read from. Compass; if you know the local variation & deviation; but there are several ways of seeing direction. eg the moon always tilts towards the equator; everything rises eastward & sets westward. shadow stick: bisect the two points where the shadow cuts a circle centred on the stick; from there, through the stick,is toward the equator. Sit & think, it beats thrashing about like a fish out of water.

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Learn before you need it..
by: Winyan Staz

Good post.
Yes we all need to learn the basics of firemaking.
We all need to practice it a number of times so that when or if we ever do need it...we already have the skills.
Don't forget to have your tinder bundle and firewood etc already before you start.
Dont forget that some pitch from a fir tree will also help kick start that fire.
If you cooking on a home-made hobo stove its good to know that you can cook a meal or boil your tea with just a few handy pinecones.
It is best to always make small fires.
For one, you use less fuel..for another you dont give your position away with a lot of smoke.
If you do your cooking with a thick overhang of branches....it will also help to dissapate the smoke before it rises.
Indians have a saying about campfires.
"Whitemen make a big fire and stand far away from it because of the heat. It can be seen from far away.
Indians make a small fire and sit close...for the heat and no one sees it." heheheh...

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