Handmade survival knife

by Dan
(Orem, UT)

If you can't find it make it

If you can't find it make it

I have never really been satisfied with conventional design. It seems as thought established knife makers start with the design first and try to fit it into the survivalist category. It should be just the opposite, design a knife for survivalists.

Based on what I felt I needed out of a knife I designed what I needed. The belly of the blade is honed in two parts. The first is honed to hold a very sharp edge. The second is honed for chopping and whacking. There is a saw on the spine and a hide scrapper on the back. Sewn into the handle are two arrowheads and matches, wrapped in para-cord.

Everything about the knife is practical and based on the survivalists skill set. The difficulty is in production, right now I can build them for around $250 I would like to get pricing to $110.

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Rob Rucci Handmade Knives

by Rob Rucci
(Upstate South Carolina)


I've been making my own hunting knives for several months now as a hobby. I use A2 tool steel for my blades. I call this knife "The Survivor".

Its full tang construction, 3/16" thick steel with a 6" blade, flat ground and hardened to Rockwell 60. I grooved about an inch of knurling just forward of handle on the spine.

The handle is African Blackwood with the tang extending beyond the handle to act as a pommel. I made a leather sheath with it that includes an integrated pouch containing a magnesium fire starter block, 50' of fishing line, 5 hooks and a whetstone for sharpening.

I've also attached a lanyard made of 3' of glow in the dark paracord which can be used for lashing, a tourniquet, etc... So far this has been a great knife for me. I've skinned, cleaned, quartered and butchered 9 deer with it and used it for all manner of camping, hunting and fishing chores.


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Favourite Knife M7 bayonet

by Kim
(Ontario)

My favorite wilderness survival knife is a modified M7 bayonet I got many years ago off ebay ($19). I removed the top section of the knife that would normally connect to the rifle barrel and drilled a hole for a lanyard in the metal under the barrel clip. It works great!

I have used it for making lean-tos, opening cans, cutting... whatever. It is a tough knife (especially if kept sharp). The US gov't spent a couple of million $$ developing that knife. It was used by the troops in Viet Nam and it works great in the Ontario north woods as well!!

The knife is damage proof. I left the tang with the rifle barrel hole so I could use it to make a spear if needed to fish or whatever. It is non-slip grip and if you get it with the sporty sheath (versus the ugly military sheath) it looks not bad as well.

Try it... you might be surprised that a quality knife, with a bit of history to it, doesn't need to be expensive!!

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Inexpensive survival knife

by G.Gelbart
(Montreal, Canada)

Get a large "saws-all" coarse-toothed metal cutting blade. Sharpen the 'back' edge and put a few layers of tape on the end for a handle. You could also shape the little projection at the end into a screwdriver.

These blades are hard tool steel, will take and hold a keen edge. Make a sheath for it and you're done.

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Make your own blade

by Mathew William Brownell
(Concordia,Ks.)

When you have spent enough time in the wilderness, slept on the cold ground. Gathered the wood and started enough campfires. Made shelter from the elements. Found water sources and purified them, hunted and trapped game, and fished in lake and river.

You will without a doubt know exactly what you will need to not only survive, but do it comfortably. You will know a wool blanket combined with a well built debris hut will keep you warm on the coldest of nights. Know to find water at the lowest parts of the terrain your in. Know how much wood to gather to get you through the night. And understand the habits and sign of all the animals, fish, insects, you can use as a food source. You'll know what tools to bring and what works best for all camp chores.

In the end, experience will show you all you need is a good strong, sharp, knife. A wool blanket, and a flint, sharpening stone. With these thing you can survive easily in any wilderness, if you possess the knowledge gained through experience. And I speak to those with such experience, not the novice.

If your a novice, take your time, carry all you think you'll need. In time lugging around gear you don't really need will get old. But only through practical experience will you come to know what the season woodsman does. And to that woodsman I say, make your own blade, and it is simple.

Carbon steel, fulltang, heat treated to RC 54-56. Grind out the blade shape you want slowly, keeping the blade cool with repeated quenching in a bucket of cold water, so as not to lose the temper in the blade. Finish with file work, it'll take some time, but that time will allow you to know the steel. Understand its strengths and weaknesses and create a blade you'll truly trust.

Wrap with cord or drill out some screw holes and mount a slab handle,whichever you prefer. Though I recommend a cord wrap, its easy to fix/replace. And the cord could come in handy for other survival situations. Dual purpose, multifunction is the key to survival tools,anyway.

Make a sheath to fit the blade shape or find one that will fit. And there you have it, a knife you know as well as you own hands. What better comfort to have in your hands than a knife made by them. That kind of confidence in a survival situation is exactly what one needs.

With your experience you'll know what blade shape, length, weight, best suits your needs. And once you've taken the step and made that knife, the confidence instilled will be vary gratifying.

If you can make the one tool you would need the most to survive, survival itself seems much less difficult. All Good Medicine.


Learn to survive in the wilderness.


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Handmade knife

by Richard
(Rockmart Georgia)

My survival knife

My survival knife

My name is Richard I have a knife that I made that I think is a good survival knife. I'm sure it is not the best knife to use but it can be used for almost any thing.

I made it out of a 1 1/4" metal cutting band saw blade which my cousin gave me from where he works. I left the teeth on it as the back and shaped it the way I wanted it by using my dremel. I used a hand file to get the edge on it then used a smooth stone rod to put a razor edge on it.

It is about 8" long total from bottom to the top. Which I like that the whole knife is all metal so it is solid and durable. It has a little bit of flexibility which I think it makes it better so it won't break.

I'm sure you know that beings it is a metal cutting blade that it is carbon steel. It will cut almost anything including bone,metal,wood ect. and in case you are wondering I have cut metal with it after I finished it.


handmade knives



2 - Here are some more knives I have made, some of these are recent.

3 - This is not a survival knife, just one I made.

4 -This one here I did today which is feb 14. Happy V DAY.


Any feedback is appreciated.

Richard

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