survival gun

by Bulltuck
(Montgomery,TX,USA)

Survival gun

Survival gun

The best survival gun is a 410 and 22 over & under. Some of these are made to take down and easily fit into a backpack. If you don't have a gun you are crazy to go out in the middle of nowhere.


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.410 or 20 ga.
by: gamekeeper

Either shotgun will help in a survival situation, if trying to survive in a place where Bears reside I'd plump for the 20ga otherwise I would be happy with a .410.
A .22 long rifle is also a good choice if you are a good shot when soaking wet, cold and hungry.
The savage 24 in various calibers is an excellent choice, I just wish I hadn't sold mine.

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410,22 mag.
by: Anonymous

grew up in the country,going to the woods not without that rifle. had me covered for anything i would find. trying to find one as we speak,savage meant quality in my mind.

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I had a 444 for years...
by: Anonymous

And a 45-70 too, Shot lots of big game with the Marlin, as far as I am concerned there is nothing they can do that a .308 can't do better, with a lighter round, with more range and less recoil.
I sold it and bought a .308 BLR, which is faster handling, lighter, shorter, more accurate,lighter ammo - easier to find, quicker repeat shot, has a detachable magazine and I swear to God that it drops big game faster than the big .44s and .45s.

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Timber dweller
by: Anonymous

I live in the woods on a homestead, need satellite to get the internet and am off grid. I carry a gun most every day. My most used gun for varmints during daily life is a .22 rifle, a CZ with a nice Leupold scope.

My most used rifle is a .44 Marlin cowboy. Most of my deer are taken with this rifle and it balances perfectly for everyday carry and is used thusly. I've also taken over two dozen elk with the .44 rifle using cast bullets for the most part.

My most used is a .44 revolver. Mostly because it is what goes on after I put my pants on each morning. I take all game with it simply because 'its there'. Deer, elk, bear and grouse have all fallen to my .44.

But my 444 is usually what I use for elk. Took a nice bull with my 444 just a few weeks ago, about 400 yards from my front door in the timber.

So overall, what is my most used firearm? The .44 mag in either a rifle or pistol, 99% of the time with a cast bullet. I never use shotguns because we have very little small game in my area.


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Survival Weapon choice
by: Anonymous

If I had to choose just one gun it would be the .410 because you can shoot both bird shot or slugs. Also if it is a single barrel you could remove the barrel turn it around and blow it like a horn.

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Savage 24's
by: Luv44's

I have an old Savage 24 in 357mag/20 gauge that I bought brand new in the late 70's or early 80's, not really sure the date. Since it can handle both 38's and 357, that makes it even more versatile. I've taken many deer over the decades with it, and even more upland game birds and even ducks and geese.

Paired with a .357 revolver, it becomes an outdoorsman dream. As a survival gun to feed ones family, its tough to beat it for versatility. Mine does very well with jacketed bullets between 140's and 158's and kills deer like the hammer of God. The fixed choke is 'about' modified, perhaps just a bit tighter. It has provided many thousand of dinner for my family over the past 35 years or so.

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best survival gun is not mossberg 500
by: Anonymous

Erik I stringly disagree with your Mossberg 500as the best survival gun.first of all there is the weight consideration of the weapon, not to mention the weight of the various rounds you mentioned most aniamls including deer, elk,hogs..etc can be taken with a .22 caliber afterall it is shot placement that is paramount in killing anything. I can carry a thousand round of .22 and scarcely notice it not to mention placing 200round sin your pants pocket...try that with 12 gauge. The perfect survival gun would be a savge model 24 in .410/.22 or 410/.22mag

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Mossberg 500 3 in 1
by: Erik

mossberg 500 3 in 1 is the best Survival gun IMO. best bang for your buck when you really want to survive and not live off of small game all the time with 22's. Its heavier than most 22's but you can take off the barrel and store it in a backpack if you want. I like the flexibility of shot,slug or rim shooting with 1 gun.

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22LR & 22 Pellets
by: Frontierman1969

Ok, I,ve read most of the post and all the large caliber guns listed are great, but lets get real...the number one issue is weight. traveling any distance is hard with a heavy gun. Match that with heavy shells and you have limited distance. A 22LR is a deadly weapon in the hands of anyone who has spent the time to become proficient .
My daughters all shoot 22LR pistols and rifles. The low cost of 22LR pistols and rifles combined with the extremely low cost and long life of 22LR shells, that can be bought in bulk to save even more money, makes practice shooting an economical family event. Practice is essential to being prepared and scenario shooting is definitely required.
Shooting an animal of any size in the ear is a kill shot. I have shot hogs, deer, turkey, and several cows and a horse with a common 22LR. It is a light weight, extremely accurate caliber that can be carried without burden. No animal or person will pose a threat once shot in the eye or ear with a 22LR.

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Double barrel shotgun
by: Anonymous

Check out this site:
http://www.petersenshunting.com/2012/08/28/is-this-the-ultimate-survival-gun/

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Savage 24V
by: Anonymous

If I had only one long gun to carry, it would be my Savage 24V in the 30-30/20 gauge variety. I know this is just about the rarest configuration of that old B-52 survival gun, but as many have mentioned, more game has been brought down with the 30-30 than any other caliber. And the 20 ga is capable of loading 3" shells so we can take all kinds of small game from birds to bunnies. Throw in a slug and you've got a second shot at that really big deer that made you nervous and miss when you pulled the trigger on the 30-30. Just flip the hammer, take aim, and take game!

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just another reason
by: bayou jim

I have visited other sites on gun survival most think that a AR of some type in a .222 or 223 is the best suvival gun. I live within 15 miles of several Wal- Mart stores and abuot 6-8 gunshopes I noticed that the gunshops had alot of these cal but Wal-Mart carried a truck load of .22s and shotgun cal.bullets. if you need something to survive would it not be best to carry some that even Wal- Mart carries

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just another reason
by: bayou jim

I have looked at several other survival gun sights and it seems that most people seem to think that survival means going to war with a AR-15 the main stay for beining able to survive as I have said many times a survival gun is the one you have on you that is loaded at the time and one you are use to shoot alot with. there is nothing wrong with a .223 or.308 or any oyher AR, but I was in several W-Marts this weekend and noticed very few .223, .222, did find a truck load of 22s and shot gun shellsand alot of high power rifle shells. When I asked the store clerk why not maney 223s, or 222s his answer was;" this stste won't allow youto hunt anythang execpt game with anything smaller then a .243 so why stock them. Another good reason not to carry a AR. I stick with a .22lr and a shotgun or combo their of.

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what to eat
by: bayou born

as I have said before I have spent a lot of time in the woods living off the land was a way of life when I was growing up just to let you know the fact is you can eat anything that has fur on it in the North American just depends on how hungry you are pluss most snakes and lizards

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22/20 mod 24
by: bayou born

I have been living in the woods off and on for about 50 yrs now depending on the amount of time I have. I have no need for want of guns as I have about 20 shotguns,rifles and handguns have hunted allover the U.S. and overseas but if it came down ti just owing 2 or 3 guts to survive on it would have to be my Savage mod 24, 22/20ga for a combo that is grate and my 357 mag both can be loaded with plenty of different types of ammo if allowed depending on where I was at woods, dessert, or inbetween I would choose eather my 45/70, 30/30,or my 30.06 once again because yoy can get plenty of different types of ammo Oh yes someone said 22s become bad if kept for a long time depends on what you keep them in when travling by boat tin or canoe I keep mine in an old peanut jay and the same when locked in my gun vault the oil from the peanutbutter left in even the cleanest jar keeps them from corroding and the plastic jar keeps them nice and dry I love 22s and have 6 different ones i buy my 22s by the brick and always store them in ol pb jars

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What you actually have...
by: Anonymous

As a Maine Guide here are my opinions...
When I'm out guiding campers and hikers I keep a Henry AR-7 in my pack and have fed myself MANY times with it on solo trips... I have dropped deer with a .22 also.
If I'm guiding hunters I choose between my Model 94 30-30 or one of my pump shotguns. Yes the shotguns ARE more versitale how many shells can you really carry look at the weight alone... The 30-30 will stop anyting in the lower 48 and then some. I have "Barked" squirrals and other small game with it but wouldn't try birds with it :)
Realistically you dont need a gun to survive I've done a week with a knife and a firesteel just to see if I could.
I'f you have to rely on "So and so's web site said this" and "my friend said" your not likely to make it on your own for long anyway your best weapon you can take with you is between your ears.

ok now everyone flame away

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My take on it
by: Lonestar

If I were limited to just 1 gun, it would be a 12 or 20 gauge shotgun. Simply changing ammo, small shot for birds & small game, slugs for large game, & 00-Buck for 2-legged vermin, if it comes down to it. I have a Rossi 22/20. The butt-stock is hollow, so I keep a box of 22's in the stock with cotton balls to keep it from rattling, along with a fire-steel, as well as a para-cord sling.

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223 over 45 long colt best survival rifle not made.
by: Anonymous

At least a 4 in 1 gun. Rifled 45 long colt lower barrel that can shoot all 410ga. shotgun rounds. Topped with a 223/5.56 NATO upper barrel that will accept MCAE chamber inserts in 22short, 22, 22lr, & 22mag rounds.It may have a big demand, I been looking, Savage, H&R, Rossi,& Newengland Arms!!!!!! Maybe even a new upstart Arms company.

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Non-Fiction
by: Anonymous

Lewis and Clark also had Model 1803 Harpers Ferry Rifles as their main arm.

I vascilate on what's best. Savage .22 Mag/20 ga. is my theoretical "one-gun." Love it but it is long and heavy for the field so is a homebody survival gun. I also have a customized take-down Rossi 10+1 .22 Mag Pump. Stowable pack and truck gun. There's the Ruger .22 Mag All-Weather bolt action I'd grab as a single bugout survival gun if the AR carbine wasn't obviously necessary. Nice mate to the NAA Mini Master 11-oz. .22 Mag 5-shot revolver. And then there's the ubiquitous 12 ga.

Note: the .22 LR is cheap and the weakest cart generally available. There are no compelling reasons to have it over a .22 Mag which basically has all the same features and benefits with twice the power. It could easily be the best single caliber to have in a survival situation...

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Why not a .44 in the .410
by: Anonymous

Now I am not suggesting this is a good idea, but I know lots of guys who fire .44 Mag. out of a .410, and one that used to get .444 Marlin cartridges from me and use those in a single shot .410. (until I realized what he was doing with them).
I doubt any of these are as good as a .410 slug, but if you want to fire a centerfire bullet down a smooth bore - there you go.
Just don't go waving your blown off hands in front of my face!
Seeing as they make that same action in .30-30 or used to, I guess it might take it...

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possibilities
by: Anonymous

Why not go for a 22/410 over under i like the m6 its light scope ready with flip up sight for 22 or 410 also you can take to a gun Smith and have the 410 chambered for a 45 long colt and it will still shoot the 4 10 shells with this combination u can kill a very wide range of animals including small game,birds,waterfowl,deer,elk,moose,bear,etc. The big game would obviously be killed with the 45 and would do so humanly

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Knowledge is the Key
by: Jason Anderson Maud Texas

I have been hunting and fishing for about 30 years. The first thing I learned is that time is the key to any survival situation. 1. If you have spent the time to learn what to do in any given situation, you are far more likely to come out of it no less the wear. 2 If you fail to prepare, then you have prepared to fail. That being said, I would have to say the 12 guage shotgun would be the gun of choice for me. Reason: 1 You can buy rifled slugs with a range of up to 100yards 2 Shells come in a variety of sizes from super small BB's all the way up to a solid rifled projectile capable of traveling over 50 yards accurately. BBB, BB, 8, 7.5, 6, 4, 00 buck shot, and if you go to firequest.com you can also get a myriad of other shell types from flachette to flares that fit into the 12 guage barrel. A pump 12 guage might be a bit heavy for some people, but if you are starving, two birds are better than one. Point is even a single shot arm bruiser like the H&R will shoot all these diff types of shells and you just have to choose what you want to carry. By the way, almost any shotgun is capable of doing all the above. But since i have used a 12 gauge for almost 30 years, it is what I am most comfortable with. I use a Remington 870 Express 3" magnum. It has killed 38 or so hogs, 18 deer,1 bear, 100 or so squirrel , at least 100 ducks, 18 geese and my old shotgun took down more than those fancy Benelli shotguns every time we went, and hundreds of crows. Learn your gun, use diff types of shells in it, and keep it with you. The worst thing you can do is NOT use it. Remember 100 years ago it wasnt considered survival, it was just every day life. The more you time you spend practicing survival skills, the less likely you will feel like your just surviving.

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Camp meat
by: High country hiker

My job keeps me in the outdoors much of the year. My belt gun will always be a .44 of some sort but during the late summer through early winter I carry a sweet little .22/410. I'd like to say that I have fed myself on a regular basis using the .44 but nothing could be further from the truth. Other than a bear sniffing through camp I've never really needed the pistol.

But the 22/410 Savage is a different story. My diet consists much of grouse and snowshoe rabbits right up until snow forces me to tear down camp. Coyotes are easy meat also and many have fallen to this sweet little M24 Savage. A grouse, the larger blue grouse in this case, are meat in the pan if I can get within 30 yards using #6 shot in 3" shotshells, whether sitting on a limb or taking flight.

Snowshoe rabbits are a bit larger and tougher and for them I use CCI Mini Mag HPs and use about 90% head shots. If I can see the sights I can just about smell them frying, out to around 50 yards or so with the factory open sights. A big snowshoe will provide 2 or 3 meals for me if alone and 1 big meal if I have a client in camp. Cut them up, fry them until crispy brown on both sides, cut up an onion and some bell peppers and toss in, covering it with a lid after adding a 1/2 cup of chicken broth. After 20 more minutes or so remove and have a meal fit for a king!

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12/22
by: Anonymous

thank you dave canterbury!!!

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Best all around Gun
by: Anonymous

Single shot 12 gauge ( New at Walmart for $150 or pawn shop for $80) with an additional .22 Long Rifle adapter ($20) is by far the most versitile survival gun. 12 gauge and .22 ammo is easiest to obtain. 12 ga is effective for hunting or defense. Experienced shooters in extreem situations can even reload a used 12 ga shell with blackpowder and BBs. Also, the adapter doesnt have to be a .22LR, there are lots of dif caliber adapters to suit your taste but .22LR is the cheapest and fairly accurate at 20 yards.

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survival
by: Anonymous

One of the best survival weapons is the Thompson Contender with the .410/.45 barrel, and having additional barrels preferably one in .22 LR. and another in 30/30 ! The Savage model 24 is also an excellent survival weapon but I feel I prefer the .22 LR over 20 gauage ! One of the best survival handguns a person can buy is the Ruger Single six with interchangable cylinders .22LR or .22 Magnum !

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M-6
by: Dean

I would like to add my endorsement to the Sprigfield M-6 as a great survival gun. A few plus coments, and one major negative. The M-6 is one of the only firearms discussed that is based on a gun designed as a survival firearm from the ground up. The origioinal frirarm was manufactured for the US Air Force as a survival tool and was part of the survival gear under the ejection seats in some aircraft. The M-6 incorporates that basic design, though it uses a longer barrel (18 1/2 inches vice 16 inches) and comes in .22 LR/.410 as well as the origional .22 Hornet/.410. The M-6 is light weight and has rugged (all steel) construction. It carrys a small ammo supply in a trap door in the stock. The unique trigger system allows the arm to be fired while wearing mittens in cold weather (and as strange as it looks the trigger feels normal when fireing. The M-6 Scout takes down (and comes together)in seconds using a single removeable pin. The sights change from open field to peep with a simple flip and the firearm is scope mount ready. Oh! That major negative? They no longer make them,so when you find one, buy it.

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survival rifle
by: Old guy

There is an old saying that said when ask by a reporter (what is the best survival gun) the expert said without a thought. The one you have with you.
Well said, perhaps though not a bear gun, the Cricket might ride in your pack or car, boat or plane. Not expensive so you wouldn't mind as bad if it were lost as you would a high dollar gun. If you don't have in your car, chances are good you will not have it with you.I see them at Wal-M for $117. and don't underestimate the 22lr.
Old Guy

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Baikal over and under
by: Charlie Smith

Be of good cheer, my Yanke friends.
Ellwood Epps up here in Ontario has the Baikal MP 34 Scout it's 22lr./410 with 3 screw in chokes it has a 23" barrel. Costs $538.80

I have found that the Baikal's shoot a better then the Savage.

There you go, don't say I never did nothin for you!

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survival gun
by: canuk

savage 4.10 .22 breaks down small ,well built,lasts test of time ,small amo ,shoots very well a little heavyer than a .22 or a4.10 single but mabe thats why it seems to hit a little harder .every thing that walks has been knocked down by one of these two rounds .plinking,hunt, servival,great little gun .used by trappers,farmers hard to come by nobody sells them my boys will have to fight over mine when im gone lol

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A great guy/Marlin Cowboy
by: Anonymous

@Fotyfor

I'd just like to take the time to give my hats off to you mate. You my friend truly knows what life is all about and that good feeling of hitting the pillow at night feeling good about selflessly helping someone in need. If we all took the time to help 1 stranger even a year like this the world would be drasticly different.

And the woman also deserves credit sharing her precious lifeline for her and her children with you. A true survivalist and helping her neighbours like I'd imagine they did way back when when they could to get by.

A Litte OT I appologize, but that post really deserves a hats off.

I agree a 22/.410 is a great setup but I was particularly interested in back country hikers marlin cowbow setup, to me that seems a very good gun to have. Somehting with a little "nut" factor that won't leave you starving when you happen to aim a little off, feel decently safe with large pests in an emergency and get great range without losing too much punch and having the rifle way too long to pack comfortable.

I'd like to learn more about making a amoded marlin cowboy like that with a load setup like it as well.

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Love the 22/410
by: Flim flam man

The 22/410 is a true survival weaon. I like to pair it with a .357 or .44 revolver and am set for most things short of a long firefight. For survival not much can beat the .22 long rifle and there are so many times a survivalist can press the .410 barrel into service on small game and game birds.

Many times I have used it as my game getter when on a long camping trip, sometimes as long as a few months. And it did a very good job of feeding me.

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survival gun
by: Old guy

I am 70 years old and bad legs, so long hikes are a thing of the past. My gun will be carried in my truck. There are 3 reasons for a survival gun. First and most important it must convince you that you can protect yourself and keep your confidence high. Second, produce food. and Third ward off any unwanted visitors. As I live in TX and only travel there and N Mex. I am very comfortable with my 22.410 savage. Though when I camp near the border of Mexico I carry a high cap. 9mm Ruger P89. with several mags. I have tried the newer buck shot shells and they work very good, even in my TC contender 410. The modle 24 is a great gun and doesn't jam. You will not be sorry.

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Savage 24
by: Anonymous

If you're interested in the Savage 24 combination rifle as your survival rifle, check out this article: www.survivalgems.com/content/Gem%20Submission/664

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Savage
by: Anonymous

I see them at the gunshows from between $250 and $350 for a 22/410.

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price????
by: Anonymous

can anyone help me wht what the price of one of these would be ??????

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Make mine a 44 Marlin
by: Back Country Hiker

My survival rifle is a Marlin Cowboy in .44 mag that I had cut back to 16 1/4" and the stock shortened slightly to use with a heavy coat. My cast bullet load of a 255gr cast at 1000fps from a .44 special case hits almost to the same point of aim as my heavier 240gr JSP at 1800fps.

The lighter load groups under 2" at 50 yards and is very very quiet. Though primarily developed for small game, grouse, rabbits and the like, I've taken a couple deer with it at close range with just a single round.

The heavier load stays around 2" at 100 yards and is heavy enough and accurate enough for game up to elk, as I've taken four to date with this rifle/load.

What a great little backpacking rifle also being so short and powerful yet very accurate and quiet if needed.

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Survival rifle
by: WoodsTramp

My survival gun is a 30-30 Marlin that I use cast bullet in. 1200fps with a 170gr plainbase is great for small game and a 170gr gas check model at 2200fps is powerful enough for game up to moose.

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300 cal
by: Anonymous 22

300 cal might be a a bit of overkill, its a great caliber don`t get me wrong but not what i would want to be stuck with. You can`t go wrong with a shotgun of any gauge. you stand a better chance of nailing whatever it is your shooting.


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a survival rifle
by: Bluenoser

I have a Savage rifle in .300 cal. I think this is MORE than enough for a Survival rifle. What do tou say??

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A lady I knew
by: Fotyfor

There used to be a lady with 2 kids that spent the summers here in the mountains where I live. They were homeless so they spent their time around the local lakes and salmon streams. She owned 1 gun, a Savage 24 in 22/410. They lived in an old station wagon that they would park and not move until they were forced to, which is 14 days around here. They'd move 5 miles and set camp up again. They may not have had much money but were always clean and seemed to eat quite a lot of fish and small game. I remember her wading and pulling cattails to eat too.

One time I didn't know she was camped in an area where I was crossing on foot, coming from the back country and hitting a gravel road and then back to my truck. When I came across their camp they were just getting ready to eat a mess of trout fresh off the fire. I introduced myself and while we talked I saw her rifle laying there. After a bit of idle chitchat I learned that She only had two 2 1/2" .410's and less than 50 rounds of .22LR's. The .22's she could afford but the .410's were something she rarely used simply because they were too expensive. She fed me a small lunch of watercress, roasted cattail roots and a nice 14" rainbow trout.

The next day I made it a point to go through my old stock and was able to dig up a little over 5 boxes of 2 1/2" and 3" .410's, mostly loaded with #6 shot. To pay her back for lunch I drove back up to her campsite and gave them to her along with 500 rounds of CCI mini mags for her .22 barrel. You would have thought I had given her a house to live in, she was so grateful. The last time I saw her was fishing along the river for salmon and she let me know that she had already taken quite a few grouse, a few ducks and a nice fat goose. Apparently she could put quite the stalk on a swimming meal......

I never saw her again after that time, when she pulled up stakes it was late in the year and the snow was flying up high where I live. I always wondered if she found the cash I stashed inside the brick of .22 shells....

My point is, if a homeless woman could feed herself and her two young children with a .22/410......well.....I reckon the rest of us could too.

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survival gun
by: Anonymous

I live out in the back woods of alaska, i have been stranded out in the woods for days before in the middle of winter and summer. A lot of survival comes from the knowleg you know. But when it come to the best survival gun i think it is a personal preferance. Mine for up here in alaska is by far a winchester mo 12 12ga. the reason for that is is has a short barrel, light to pack, and there is know fancy sights or any of that stuff, it is a very plain jane gun. Frum my many exposers to the wilderness i could tell you that there is always a perfect gun for diferent secomstaneces but i think this one filles mist of the applications. One thins to always stay a way from os a gun with a scope, because what happens if you are out and drop your gun and tweek the scope now what? The 12 gauge is a goog caliber all the way around because you have bird shoot for hunting small game and you can have saabo rounds witch can help pertect you and have accuracy out to a greater distance than a slug. So thats my personal pref.

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Common sense
by: Shanghai Jack

On May 22, 2011 anonymous posted 22. I think this is the last word on the subject except for personal preference. He is right. Unless you plan on getting into a survival situation chances are that you will not have your favorite or personal choice. It is your knowledge and skill that will see you through. Personal preparation will score the highest. Thanks anonymous for your insight.

"A mediocare plan executed violently is better that the best plan executed to late" Gen Patton

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22
by: Anonymous

In all honesty, the best survival gun is the one you`ve got. You probably have put some rounds through it and know what it can do. Yes i would like to have an anti aircraft cannon when facing a bear or a 410 when facing grouse or rabbits. But the truth is what u have is what you know and what you know will get you the furthest. I like my 22lr bolt action ....rabbits ..turkey maybe...little critters. But my 12 gauge will do the the same. Now they even have slip in sleeves 223, 20-16-410 gauge. 20-16 410 sleeves are not very big at all. 223 maybe a bit much on accounts that its the length of the barrel but still...
in reality the best survival tool is your knowledge of local wild edibles. Cuz ur passing a whole lot more food on the ground while your looking for meaty eats.
Combos are unique in that you get 2 guns for the weight of 1 more or less. how can you beat that.

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Mick has a point!
by: Charlie Smith

On canoe trips and such, where I know I am not realy going to have to "survive" for very long, I carry a 12 or sometimes gauge 20 shotgun a few birdshot, (for emergency eating)and a handfull of slugs, (by the way 20 gauge buckshot is nearly worthless). Although it is better "bear spray" than anything out of a can. After all a bear sprayed bear is mighty hard to eat!
And oh, by the way a .22 works just fine in the cold, works fine on a bear too, both my brother and I have killed sizable bears with .22s.
In the not to distant past most of the Indians in the far north of Ontario did all there hunting, moose, bear, whatever... with .22s.
You have to aim though.

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Bear Spray and a .22
by: Anonymous

Hello everyone. I see lots of good advice here. I would just like to add that a study showed that bear spray was actually more effective than a firearm for bear defense.

http://www.survival-gear-guide.com/support-files/bear-spray.pdf

I would like to get a Savage Model 24 in the future myself, and would carry that plus bear spray.

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Further thoughts:
by: Mick

Another thing to consider. Who were some of the best "survivalists" in our nations history? The pioneers of course. Can you even imagine the hardships they had to go through traveling all those miles in an old wagon? Then settling in and for many home was a sod house. These dirt poor families couldn't afford fancy sixguns and repeating rifles. They were a luxury. Most of these families were armed with some form of shotgun or smoothbore blackpowder musket. And with those shotguns they fed thier familes and protected them from harm. It has been said that the shotgun was the true gun that won the west and in my humble opinion I must agree...

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Shotgun all the way!!!
by: Mick

What does "survival gun" really mean? A hunting arm? Defensive arm? And in a survival situation how long do you expect to BE in that type of situation? People talk about carrying a years worth of .22 shells! Silenced .22's? Get serious! Unless kept dry the wimpy .22 goes south quick with minimal prolonged exposure to any type of bad weather. Ugh!
If you have big game in your area then a centerfire scoped rifle is in order. For a utility/truck gun it would be hard to find a better gun than the single shot 20 gauges. If your hiking or boating and end up stranded I would much rather have the 20 gauge than a .22 or 410. You don't need to pack enough ammo for an army. I carry an elastic shell holder on the butt of the shotgun with a mix of three birdshot and two slugs or buckshot. An extra 5-10 shells can be packed into a coat or pack.
I have been stranded out in the Washington woods overnight in the pitch black and very cold pouring rain. A canoe trip gone bad. I didn't have a firearm. I wasn't dressed for bad weather. The elements drained me of just about all my energy within 12 hours. Hunger set it and I can tell you another 8-12 hours of that weather I may have very well been dead. I heard a bear circling me for hours. I managed to get a fire going (my last match) which I believe saved my life. I set next to it in that cold rain turning every ten minutes trying to stay warm. I had nothing. No gun. No knife. I didn't get off the river in time to build a shelter. Kept thinking I would come to a road. When daylight came I tried walking out. Bear scat littered the road every thirty yards. I kept looking around me as I walked the five miles to a highway. The only thing I saw were little birds and some small chipmunks. No deer. No elk. No large squrrils. No grouse... That left a huge impression on me. If I had been unable to walk out and had to spend another night out there then I wanted a shotgun to drop any feathered tweety I could get a bead on. I wanted a shotgun to fend off a bear. When your wasted and shaking that .22 is awful hard to operate and shoot well. The shotgun only required the hammer to be pulled back and pointed.
The .22 sounds great and works well as a hunting gun but when things go wrong and your at the mercy of mother nature I'll bet your priorities will change in a hurry. I never go out anymore without the single shot shotgun, extra shells, a multitool (Leatherman)on the belt, some sort of fire starter, sports bars and a tiny folded space blanket. I learned my lesson.

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The facts, man.
by: Anonymous

The short barreled AR-15 carbines are where it's at for survival and combat, because Ciener Firearms offers a .22lr conversion unit for them. So you can have the 1/4 mile reach, power, and penetration of the 223, or you can have the quiet foraging, cheap practice of the .22lr. The caliber swap takes only 20 seconds.

The point of impact (POI) of the 2 calibers is never more than 2" apart at 50 yds. The unit costs $150, altho the more desirable 30 rd magazine jacks that up to nearly $200. The unit weighs only 3/4 lb and is quite accurate, reliable, durable.

I've owned several, and with a scope, benchrest and ammo that it liked, the worst grouped 2" at 50 yds, and 1 was under 1". You can get 80% finised AR-15 lower receivers in the mail, finish them yourself, and have no need of an FFL or any license to make a gun. The rest of the parts can be had from a dozen different sources, but ModelOneSales is one of the best. RockRiver Arms sells finished lowers for $150. Look for them on gunsamerica.com, GunBroker.com,

The 22lr weighs 135 rds to the lb. 20 ga is about 18 shells to the lb. The 410 is so short ranged as to be nearly worthless. Animals and birds all stop eventually. Except for goose and turkeys, birds aren't WORTH a shotshell in a survival situation.

The 22 autorifle is far superior to the shotgun for survival. A sound suppressor makes it so. Why scare off all the game when you fire once? Why call in every enemy within 2 miles?

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survival
by: Anonymous

My favorite backwoods survival gun, would be the American derringer corp. Model 8 alaskan over and under. It wieghs in at 24 oz. Comes in many calibers including 45/70 although I carry a .45 colt/.410. with the 8 in. barrel and oversized grips.

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20ga/.22
by: Anonymous

At very close range shotgun pellets are still grouped together and penetrate together like a slug for the first few inches of penetration Many bears have been killed with bird shot at very close ranges when charging. Sure as hell wouldn't use it unless I was charged though. I have used .410 and it is a 20Yard shotgun because any pattern test will show you that the small number of pellets leaves huge holes in pattern past that range unless you use tiny shot that will bounce of a squirrel. and the 20GA is a 49 yd shotgun. Simply too few pellets for larger game strikes.If you using a .410 at least use #5 shot. Going down to 7 1/2 for more pellets is a bad idea. At longer ranges they won't penetrate worth crap except on small birds and close squirrels. Can't eat a wounded animal. A single #5 pellet that penetrates the vitals will kill much quicker than 6 71/2s that don't reach the vitals and stopp in the muscle tissue. Jack rabbits won't even slow down for them unless it is damn close range. They are fine for grouse and other very soft skin creature at close range. My Savage .22/20 was one of most accurate of 6 .22s I owned and the Winchester slugs grouped very well at 50 yds for a smoothbore. With slugs it shot about 4 inches low compared to the .22 barrel at 50 yds so I always knew to aim 4 inches high at target or game with slugs.I keep it scoped with 4x a Leopold handgun scope. Itis a very versatile gun and always one of my favorites of the 13 guns I own. Savage has been steadily earning a very good reputation as a very accurate gun for little money.

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Baikal Taiga
by: Charlie Smih

I have a Baikal Taiga, it's a 12 gauge with a 30-06 barrel slung underneath, not too heavy at all, comes with 4 chokes, is very good for grouse, I shot lots of them on a recent moose hunt.
I suppose if a fellow wants to compare combination guns it would be a better choice than any .223 or .410, maybe even better than a 30-30 over 20 guage.
This Taiga shoots like a house on fire, is very accurate, which is way more than I can say for any Savage that I have ever shot, and even though it is in heavier calibers it is not quite as heavy as most of them.

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Heavy Savage Combo Guns
by: Anonymous

I had a savage years agom 22 20 gauge. Dont know if you all just ATV drive thriough bush, I used to walk 20 miles plus,a day Hard Hunting. Wear a pair boots plumb out in a week, That savage sucked darn Heavy. I carry a Tikka .223 12 fgauge (rechambered by gunsmith for a tight .223 chamber)accurate as heck to 200 meters. Also have a 12 gauge 30-06 bruno i bought lighter than the savage .Just my opinion Mike

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Taurus Judge
by: Anonymous

OK, if food is your concern for survival and weight is important a lightweight Taurus Judge may be a good option. It will shoot all different 410 shells. Even I can can hit a bird or two with it. It will also shoot 45 Long Colt that come in some large sizes up to about 330 grain and 1800 ft-lbs. That is close to a 30-30 and you have five shots. I carry a cartridge belt with all different loads. I am trying to find some flares for 410.

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Savage
by: Anonymous

i have a savage 30-30 20ga over and under , the selector is on the hammer making it easy to switch between upper and lower barrels. that give me 2 shots in a second or 2 IF you encounter a bear beheaving badly with a 20ga slug and a 30-30 it beats have to reload for a 2nd shot.
Remember if a bear is coming at you , you will be scared and fumbling to reload ....well enough said

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good guns
by: Anonymous

I have a savage 22lr/410 OVER UNDER COMBO GUN,I use it for hunting grouse when I am moose hunting in my home of northern canada.I can't think of a better survival gun for food to keep you alive when your lost

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My own oppionion
by: Anonymous

I own a 410/22 over and under combo rifle jjust got it this christmas and well ive never been huntin before ut i can admit for a 14 yr old kid like me i do have a likin to it and if i were to go out in the country i would take it with me no matter what its a good gun and a great start gun for kids but before letting them try this break them down on the 22 first i would suggest a 22 rifle and pistol is the best idea there once they get to be about 114 or 15 let them have a shot at this and dont go giving them a gun thats to big best choice is the 410/22 over and under combo

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My survival gun choices
by: Deep Woods

I live in the deep woods, using a generator and propane. Much of my year is spent in the woods, often many weeks at a time here in the PNW. My choice for protection AND for feeding me is handled by 2 firearms in 2 ways.

The first way is I carry a short barreled (4 5/8") .44 mag revolver. Along with that I carry a Savage 24 in 22LR/410. A dozen extra cartridges on my belt for the .44, a box of 50 for the .22 and 25 for the 410 barrel is WAY more than enough for even a 6 week expedition. I've never ran out of cartridges on the longest of treks.

The other way is I like to pack a 4 5/8" Ruger Single Six on my belt and a .44 Marlin rifle with a 24" barrel. This will be my choice when it is hunting season. The rifle holds 12+1 which I keep loaded with all 12, plus a wallet pack of 12 more. A box of 50 for the .22 pistol and I am outfitted for just about anything.

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M6
by: Anonymous

Where on earth could I find one of these guns? I have searched for months and Cant find the .22/.410 rifle. Please help! johnsricharde@yahoo.com

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The .22 will outrange a .410 easily!
by: Charlie Smith

I just did quite an extensive study, (at -20 or so, survival happens at inopportune times), I used a stencil of a roughed grouse with anatomical scoring as the target. My conclusion was that I actually had more range with most of my centerfire rifles on partridge than I did with a .410. The .410 is nearly useless in my opinion. And by the way I have shot lots of big animals with a .22: cattle, swine, elk, deer. It takes careful shot placement but still probably has more range than a pissant .410.
The whole test is coming up in Backwoodsman Magazine.
Oh, the most range? The .22 mag. with scope, but because of legality, I went with the a .22 lr. bolt action with scope. Although I did really like the 20 gauge single shot too. Mine handles Brenneki slugs wonderfully. The .22 had more range and was lighter as a unit though.

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AR-7
by: Anonymous

The AR-7 is a very nifty and interesting novelty but has no place in a survival kit. they are cheaply made out of sheet metal and plastic(you get what you pay for). I had one a year or so ago. I got about a thousand rounds through it then it became a single shot, if i was luck i got 4 rounds before it jammed. I traded it for a marlin .17 HMR. a much better round and a much better rifle.

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30-30: my Best Choice
by: Bush Bob

OK... survival isn't seeing how many 22 holes you can put in a pop can, its about signaling, its about finding something to eat, its about staying alive when the chips are down. It is also being compliant to firearm/hunting regs. Breaking the game regs with the excuse you might die in the bush, will only get the gov't on your case. Then you will be trying to survive a court case, fines or confiscation. I like the 30-30. I keep it out of site when the season is closed. I tuck it away when travelling, but I still have it, if I need to dig it out. Yah... the .20 ga. is good. The 410 is too weak (unless its hunting season and you have lots of time and shells). Do I suggest you shoot ducks with a 30-30 - no, unless you haven't eaten in 3 days.

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lewis and clark
by: Anonymous

there is evidence that Lewis and Clark might have taken an air rifle with them

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running into game wardens
by: Anonymous

if i`m walking on a well know trail, then turn and walk say a days worth and try and get lost, how likey is it to run into a game warden? or anyone else for that matter...if i have to right gear i belivie i can make it anywear i have the willpower and smarts to survive, but i`m most worried about running into someone else, u know what i mean?

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Savage 24
by: Woods Bum

I have two savage 24's, one it .22/410 and the other is .22/20 gauge. I carry the 410 most of the time.

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Good info here
by: Shanghai Jack

I agree that to go into the back country without a firearm is nuts. I have read the comments and find that the 20 gage consensus has a lot of merit. I have had three encounters with black bears while in the mountains. The worst encounter cost me my pack. I did have a weapon but did not use it. I carry a folding stock 12GA, but it is what I am use to. I carried one professionally for 26 years. Being from the US maybe I ought to go to the 10ga:] The 20ga combo seems to make more sense. Time to tell the wife I need a new gun!

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please help me out
by: Anonymous

I have been searching for a .22/410 for what seems like eternity do guys think you could help me out? resin21713@hotmail.com

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M6 in 22 Hornet
by: Anonymous

The Springfield M6 survival rifle comes in a .410 guage over 22 Hornet. The 22 Hornet produces 750 ft.lbs. of energy compared to about 100 ft. lbs of energy for a 22. A simple 44 magnum also produces about 750 ft. lbs. The 22 Hornet is much more effective for medium size game than a 22. The .410 is great for birds and with a slug in 3" magnum takes care even taller critters.

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22lr over 410
by: Anonymous

I have many so called survival rifles in my cabnet from the ar7 to the win defender but my fav has to be the savage m24 and anyone who will tell you that a 41 cal slug wont stop a black bear at 50 yards must live in the us of a where bigger is better in canada we put the first one where it will be the last one just want to add that in 40 years of wilderness survival and hiking I have taken two black bears and a moose with that m24 and more small game then most will ever see in thier life time .
and the true meaning of a survival gun is the one you are carring .
happy trails from the great white north.

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bear killer round
by: Anonymous

Years ago N. of Hell Hole CA hunting Mtn Quail I had to shoot a charging bear with my 20GA (24D 22/20), Luckily I had time to swap rounds from #8 bird to a 5/8 oz slug as when it charged it actually slipped off the logging road on oak leaves and tumbled to the right but scrambled back to the road surface and closed on us. Shot penetrated between its left shoulder and stopped near its bowels, tumbled like a rag doll dead. The slug fractured 11 bones as it passed through its body according to biologist. It also had a 3 inches of a "fishing" arrow lodged in its rear quarter which is probably why it was in such a "foul" mood. I also found out that the area is where Fish & Game deposits "undesirable" bears that are removed from Yosemite Nat. Park back in them day.

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Had more than pellet guns...
by: Anonymous

Lewis and Clark were armed with muzzleloading rifles. They were using a type of muzzleloading military rifle with a 60 grain charge of black powder.

READ YOUR HISTORY! They used firearms! They did have one air rifle that was 40 or so caliber.

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forget the 20; take the .410
by: Anonymous

In a true wilderness survival situation all you need is a .410 and/or .22 long rifle. If you're over 50 years old you'd better stick to the .410 just in case you lose your glasses. Twenty-gauge ammo is heavier and for survival is not needed, in fact can be too destructive at close range. I've spent months in the wilderness and after many mistakes and miscalcuations have found that the one best gun for "eating" is the .410. I can carry nearly twice as much ammo as opposed to a 20 gauge, and in the wilderness that's extremely important. All I carry is the 2 1/2 inch shells. You can run all of this into the ground but ultimatel wildnerss survival is dependent on many factors: the gun, your trapping skills, your sign-cutting talents, and your luck. If you do opt for a .22 long rifle make sure it has a scope. You'll not be living on deer and elk (unless you're wasteful); you'll be living on birds, small mammals, fish and the greens and fruit you can gather. As for type of gun: Keep it real simple. A break open single shot .410 works just fine, plus it's light and after a week of hardly eating you'll appreciate the minimal weight. Don't delude yourself. Wilderness survival can be tough, dangerous and very stressful. You'll go from feast to famine. Just don't be wasteful. That's the mark of an immature person.

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The Author is Correct
by: Anonymous

410 over 22 is everything you need for gathering food. Shot placement is always the critical factor with any weapon and a 22 is cheap, it's light and it will get the job done.

Use a 20 ga on a bear? Right. All a 20ga will do is piss him off and get you killed. Bear spray is the best defense for bears.

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44 shot shells - not good
by: Anonymous

I can tell you one gun that is not good for survival. I carried a 44 mag lever action with #9 shotshells. They are useless on grouse. #9 is too small for anything and the range is too short - forget that one. Shooting a grouse with the 44 hollow point just ruins the meat.

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Surviving the warden !!
by: Anonymous

I agree with those 20ga. guys. A .22 may be fun to take with you, but when the chips are down, and it isn't fun any more, a 20 ga is want you need. I have a Rossi .22/20ga combo kit. It is great. I can plink with the .22, and when it is time to scoot off the bears... 20ga. You are right about not wanting to look like you are on a hunting trip in July! Walking around with a belt load of 30-30 shells in July isn't what the game warden likes to see!! I can talk my way around with the combo kit (providing the .22 is hooked up). Walking around the bush in the summer with any shotgun may get you in trouble with the law. Survival isn't hunting and it isn't plinking. You need to watch for the game warden as much as the bears, even though you haven't done anything.

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guns
by: lighthorse

forget the 410... to small to short of range,and to light. go with the 20 gauge and 22lr combo or 20/3030,20/223,20/243/etc. get the idea.

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20 ga works for me!
by: Anonymous

I agree the 20 ga is the best survival gun. A survival gun is the gun you take with you when you are not hunting (when the seaon is closed). If you get stuck in the bush during moose season, then your 30-06 becomes you survival gun. Since you are not hunting and you do not want the game warden to fine you, generally survial guns are stored taken apart in your gear to be used when needed, but out of sight of wardens. In northerm Ontario, there is no summer hunting license so whatever you are packing should not look like you are on a hunting trip. A 22 requires you to be a good shot, a shotgun just gets it done! Bears are a problem - really just big racoons! and 20 ga slug will do it, a 22 will just make it made.

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Survival firearm
by: Anonymous

The best survival firearm I have ever used is the "Partner" NEF single shot 20ga shotgun. This gun comes in at 5+ pounds. The 'Partner' is light and comes apart for easy packing - especially important if you fly into the bush. My experiance is that 'survival' seems to happen when the weather is really bad - cold and wet. Sometimes my hands are so cold I can hardly get the small 22 shells into the chamber or a clip; but a 20ga shell seems to drops into the chamber all by itself. The 20 ga is good to signal with (way louder than a 22). You can shoot ducks, geese, grouse much easier than with a 22. Bears, which are the source of a lot of bush problems, can be shot with slugs (a 22 would be useless). Note: Survival isn't hunting. The NEF 'Tamer' looks interesting - but I haven't shot one.

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Springfield M6 Scout
by: DaNangPete

one of the best take down survival guns ever is the Springfield M6 Scout rifle in 22/410





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gun
by: Anonymous

a take apart 22lr is all that is required,forget the 410 part the 22 will kil everything that a 410 takes and more. who wants to pack 2 different types of ammo

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Gun
by: andrew cochran

Although lewis and clark took one air rifle they used muzzleloaders as well. I just wanted to clear that up.

I think an AR-7 like henry makes is the best choice.

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Pelletgun
by: Anonymous

Think about pellet guns in the .22 ,the 177 cal is not enough. NOT the co2 type! I have a benjamin and did some testing {.22 cal} ,i used a skull from a mule deer and at 30 paces it penetrated the skull behind the eye ,leaving a hole that my little finger could almost pass through. One of the benifits is the space the pellets take up compared to ammo. Reed your history ...Lewis and Clark had only PELLET rifles on thier journey!!!!! Of course they were larger calibers. Sooooo give a good pellet gun some thought!!!!

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