Survival hunting

by Tim
(Louisville,KY&THE ROAD)

Emergency Preparedness #9 DEFENSE/HUNTING

Emergency Preparedness #9 DEFENSE/HUNTING

I refer to the following items as tools as well as weapons. My items serve double purpose to cut down on extra weight. They were chosen after much thought and do their jobs very well.

My choice for a handgun is a TAURUS TRACKER in.357 magnum. It is a seven shot revolver and only comes in stainless. The handgrip will fit people with small hands and is a very comfortable rubber one. It has a 6" ported barrel that develops enough foot pounds of energy to legally hunt deer with. The.357 also gives you the option to load it with snake shot and.38 special+P loads on down.

For everyday concealed carry I have a SMITH&WESSON 442 airweight in.38+P. It is hammerless and a joy to carry, it hides well in the waistband.

I have two top choices for my long arms both of these I currently own. My top choice is a THOMPSON CENTER ENCORE. Mine has several barrels for it,a.50 caliber muzzle loader with a 3x9x50mm scope,a.30-06 springfield with a 3x9x50mm scope and a 12 guage 28" vent rib barrel with screw in chokes. That is about $1200.00+ of gun but it covers all the options.

My second choice is my NEF HANDI-RIFLE in.17HMR.I am going to get a 12 guage barrel for it also. I have written a complete article on this gun. It is also on this web-site and titled "Inexpensive Rifles".

My choice for cutlery is as follows:
ONTARIO KNIFE CO SP-5
COLUMDIA RIVER neck knife w/kidex sheath
COLD STEEL bird and trout knife w/kidex sheath
GERBER E-Z ZIPPER for opening up game animals


"SAFE JOURNEY'S"



Emergency Preparednes Article # 1 TARPS

Emergency Prepardness # 2 TENTS/SHELTER

Emergency Preparedness #3 WATER

Emergency Preparedness # 4 LATRINE/ HOT SHOWER

Emergency Preparedness #5 PORTABLE KITCHEN

Emergency Preparedness # 6 BEDROOM

Emergency Preparedness # 7 COMMUNICATION

Emergency Preparedness #8 TRAVEL/NAVIGATION

Emergency Preparedness #9 DEFENSE/HUNTING



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Opinions
by: Mad Dog

Life is hard its even harder if you stupid _ John Wayne.

I carry a gun when I am not sleeping, taking a shower and thats about it not paranoid just ready. Recently here in southern Indiana a man was killed by two dogs while he was out walking down the road. My gun is a tool for the occasion. I have revolvers, Glocks, 1911s and an assortment of long guns. I like multi guns ie: 44 special and 44 magnum, 357 magnum and 38 special. I have a TC Pro Hunter that will shoot 460, 454 Casul and 45 Long Colt. I have a H&R Hnadi chamber for 445 Super Mag, 44 magnum and 44 special. There is no perfect gun just a compromise on size, caliber and purpose. My first choice in bear country would not be a Glock 19 but its better than a rock, same as in the urban jungle the Glock 19 is great but my 4" S&W 629 would work.

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Reply
by: Nomad

I agree without the thought of a pellet rifle, it is quiet and effective. The ammo is cheap and as you noted, it doesn't have a shelf life.
Something that I recently found out about is .22 ammo made by AGUILLA. They offer all sorts of powderless cartridges that are surprisingly accurate and lethal. The range of these cartridges are limited but if you respect their limitations they'll put small game on the table.

I realize that this site is titled WILDERNESS SURVIVAL. I like to think outside of the box.
For example: if a person was hunting in a treestand and fell out of it. In the fall he broke or severely injured one or both of his legs. Or an arm or both. If it were his legs and he is now immobilized due to his injuries. Does that constitute a wilderness survival situation. After all he cannot get up to set and tend traps or snares. He may not even be able to get back to his camp. So there he is lying on the ground, injured. He did manage to reach his firearm that landed nearby and or had a pistol on his hip. He can now defend himself from predators. He might even be able to lie still enough for some critter to come near him. If one does he could shoot it and have something to eat. We would hope that he also had a pack containing a canteen near the base of the tree.

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Yes, guns are survival tools...
by: Anthony Frailey

To the "nay sayers" out there... survival isn't ALWAYS being stranded alone, with only your multitool/huge knife. Nor is it always completely an accidental outing.

It is always a very real possibility... you could simply be a survivor of some catastrophe, or even a war.
Don't think, something like the Movie, "Red Dawn" couldn't happen to you.

If you have a chance to plan ahead, and stuff a "go bag", horde up a cellar full of gear and food stuffs... I say go for it.

Now, the Original Poster... had his fav and thoughtful desires if he could have his hunting guns with him. It's great food for thought, and I love that he shared his experience, and took into consideration the audience as well.

Me, I'd add in an unlikely "gun", or rifle to hunt with.
A powerful, breakbarrel ... spring .177 pellet rifle. yes, I said pellet rifle.
Why? It's quiet, very quiet. Ammo, is so cheap it's scary, and comes in hundred and thousands... and they have no shelf life.
There is more small game, than there is large game... they breed faster, and replenish more.
small game takes less effort to process, not to mention smoke time is considerably less.
Doves, Grouse, Ducks, Geese, Turkey, rabbit, squirrel, porcupine, coon, rat, turtle, snake, frogs, nutria, quail, ground hog, chipmunk, fox, ect ... can be taken out easily with a pellet rifle. Go for head shots.
When ya are hungry... you will eat more types of animals than you'd think.
Supplement hunting, with snares and simple trapping... and light fishing/scavenging for clams, mussels, prons, and crayfishes.
Don't forget to get a copy of wild edible plants ... and with any hopes, you bought some seeds, and stored em away, so you can grow a few veggies too later on. You can pot them, if needs be.


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Guns ?
by: Anonymous

Well it seems we are all in agreement that taking along a gun is not what we would all call being in a Survival Situation. Give the guy a break, I think he has mentioned some really great ideas thus far and many of which i think we will all agree with are GREAT. I have to admit , i am not a Gun Man myself, Although my Father would have wanted me to, it was my Grand Father whom instilled Natures Way of Survival. I get '' lost '' in these Rocky Mountains here in Colorado every chance i can. I hate the city and so love parking the car putting on my pack and getting my girls on her and both of us taking a 3 day hike miles and miles into the Unknown. So again let the man chose his path and even his firearm. !0 years ago on a hike and camp trek in the Rocky Mountain National Forest I would have loved to have had a firearm handy. Seems a Mountain line wanted to see what all the fuss was and entered our camp area. No one was harmed but I assure you the adrenalin was flowing like a river that night.One never knows what creatures we have evicted from their homes will decide to take them back one day. May Peace Be Found On your Journeys.

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Reply to Wolf
by: Nomad

I enjoy reading a magazine called Wilderness Way, it covers all aspects of primitive skills. The authors of the articles are mostly primitive skills instructors. I read an article not long ago by one of them stateing that they could not think of one person among them who could walk naked into the wilderness today and survive for a long period of time.
It sounds like you are "just really getting into this survival thing" so I don't think you can do it either. I could be wrong. When you submit some articles about these survival skills that you possess I would like to read them.
The romance of being able to live off the land is nice but there is a thing called reality. I faced this and realized it takes a lot just to provide basic needs. So I aquire the skills that I can and prepare in advance for my other needs.
We as a modern society are no longer taught the primitive skills from birth on. We can't walk out into the wild and provide food,shelter,water and fire at will. There are a few that can do most of it but the average person cannot. The ancient one's who did do this did it as a society relying on each other.
Lets say an individual / group were canoeing in a wilderness area far from any roads or trailheads and rolled their canoe. In doing so they lost the canoe along with most of their gear. Wouldn't that put them in a survival situation? If they salvaged other modern gear should they use it or throw it in the river and try to survive by primitive means? The better prepared an individual /group is the better chance of surviveing they have.
If people didn't prepare for the "what if" there wouldn,t be a need for survival kit's.
Do you take a knife with you when you go to the wilds? If so why? Wouldn't you just knapp a flint blade and haft it in a wood handle useing hide glue and sinew. No of course not it takes to much time and resources just to create a knife. So why not take along a shotgun if possible?
A survival situation is like life it happens, you don't plan for it to.
I am trying to put some imformation out there for those interested.
I hope I didn't offend anyone.

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Reply to Anonymous Part 1
by: Nomad

Part 1

First I would like to say thank you for serving our country as well as teaching others to defend themselves.
It does sound as though you haven't got out and lived much except for what the military taught and or instructed you to do. I feel you are pulling your opinions from a narrow database.
In colonial times this wonderful country depended on the militia as much as the armed forces to defend it. The militia was comprised of everyday citizens who took up arms when it was necessary. They were the hunters / woodsmen who were raised from childhood in the backwoods of America, usually hunting with firearms. I am from this type of upbringing; I was given my first shotgun for Christmas at age 6. I have been hunting ever since and spend as much of my free time in the backwoods as possible.
History not opinion tells us that the .45 ACP was developed as a man stopper. It utilizes a low velocity projectile to deliver a lot of knockdown power to the assailant (a muzzleloader utilizes the same principle). I feel it is an excellent choice for its intended purpose. I think it would fail the average person greatly as a number one choice for a survival weapon.
History all tells us that a revolver is a far more reliable choice.
I believe you are the one that is misinformed or should I say not informed. I have hunted with all of the weapons except the .357 revolver. I have luckily not needed to use any of my firearms in a defense situation. The .357 in my opinion is far more versatile than the .45 ACP that you suggest. The .357 allows high power defense loads, low recoil loads for hunting large birds (ducks, wild turkeys, pheasant, etc.), birdshot and 3 ball buckshot for smaller game. It doesn't have feeding issues with ball or hollow point ammo either. In my opinion I don't see this much versatility in a semi-auto loader. I also don't see everyone being able to handle a larger frame firearm with potentially higher recoil. Besides how much squirrel do you think would be left to eat after being hit by a .45?
That is providing a person could even dispatch one with it.


To Be Continued... Nomad

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Reply to Anonymous part 2
by: Anonymous

Part 2

As far as the other weapons that I suggested the shotgun is probably the number one all around choice, providing that you purchase one with screw in chokes and preferably a 26" or 28" barrel in 12 guage. Why this gun you might ask? A 12 gauge has enough knockdown power to dispatch Alaskan brown bear/ grizzlies using slugs. In some states you cannot hunt deer with a center fire rifle so a shotgun is used to harvest deer out to 200 yards with a slug and slug barrel / slug choke. It can also be loaded with a very wide variety of buckshot and various pellet type shot including steel shot. This gun is capable of taking game as small as doves all of the way up to elk and moose. Again I just don't see the same amount of versatility in a .45 ACP.
While various rifles extend a persons accuracy and thus effected game / defense range, sometimes out to 600 or 800 yards. I think rifles would be difficult for the average person to use to harvest small fast moving game especially in close quarter situations. I will add that I have read articles about poaches out west using the .17 HMR to illegally take elk.
I hope this helps explain my reasoning. I also hope this doesn't offend anyone as these are merely my opinions. I respect everyone's opinion and welcome them.

Nomad


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Tim, wrong site buddy!
by: Wolf

Just when I was really getting into this survival technique thing, you went and ruined it for me. Even though having a gun while you're lost in the woods might be a good idea, I believe you've got the wrong idea of what this site's all about. When I think of "wilderness survival", I think of surviving using nothing but what our Creator has laid before me. For some reason, mentioning a gun just doesn't "cut" it for me.
Sorry if I offended anybody...

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misinformed
by: Anonymous

All those guns are terrible for defense or hunting for defense carry a semi-auto with a slim design for easy concealment such as a colt 45 or baretta 92f even better is a hk usp even though it has a double stacked magazine it still capable to be concealed and 12+1 45 ACP rounds will never lead you astray, all this is based on my experience as a retired Marine Recon member and now personal defense consultant


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not all that bad
by: Anonymous

I think it is a good idea to have your firearms with you. Even if you dont get lost and need to hunt down some food they are still nice to have around for protection.

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Survival Hunting
by: Nomad

Yes you are correct that this is my leisure camping set-up. As is stated in article one I provided this information more for post-disaster type situations than being lost in the woods. Some of my gear does cross over to a wilderness enviroments. Remember thatpeople do not need to be in a remote area to be in a survival situation. Anyone who becomes displaced or loses everything they own but the clothes their wearing could use this series to provide for themselves and their family. Thanks for adding comments it lets us know people are reading the articles.

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123
by: Anonymous

Having read your articles, it seems more like you're doing some leisure camping than survival.

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hunting guns
by: Nomad

I agree with what your saying and I use those options also. I do not carry all of the guns at once, I was just putting some options out there for people to consider. I down sized to a Taurus model 605 .357 which is lighter and smaller. The other gun that I would most likely have with me is the NEF .17 HMR. A person can carry alot of ammo in a small space and it is lighter than a center fire.

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What?
by: Brian

I have to agree with the last person that posted if you have all these firearms with you seems to me that you would be lost from hunting and not in a survival situation.

What I carry in my survival pack for food is very lightweight and does the trick for many jobs.

First I carry a small spool of trip wire (comes in OD green and yellow) i've learned how to make snars and where to place them for the best results. 90% of the time catching squirrel or rabbit.

I also carry a very sharp 5 dollar folding blade and a one way razor blade this cuts down on weight and does the job quite well for skinning and gutting.

Also learn something new, try learning about wild edibles they are everywhere once you know what you are looking for. You probably walk over dinner all the time!

So leave the guns at home and try something new!

Brian

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What?
by: Anonymous

It's not really survival if you have all of your favorite firearms with you. It just means you're lost, not surviving.

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