The Ultimate Survival Knife

by Tim Ralston
(Scottsdale AZ USA )

Gear Up has partnered with oldest knife maker in Nepal to hand produce the Ultimate Survival Knife! This knife has been field tested for the last 2500 years. It's hand made by the Bishwakhamas (born & trained as Khukuri makers). Each knife has over 50 hours of crafting to produce your custom Khukuri into the “The Ultimate Survival Knife".

The weapon maintains its traditional shape yet is enhanced with additional features combining useful tools needed to survive in any emergency situation. The enhancements are an aggressive saw back, hammer back, chisel, slicer belly, hand guard, and lanyard holes for easy spear making.

The blade is a full tang, at 7 inches long and weighing 900 grams. The handle is made from buffalo horn. The sheath is made from a thick buffalo hide with a compartment that conceals a steel match for fire starting. This will be the one knife that every bug out kit should have.


Be a wilderness survivor, not a wilderness victim.

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My best survival knife

by Kenneth
(US)

this is the knife

this is the knife

this is the knife
this is the knife with the survival kit
this is the knife in the sheath

I have several "survival knives" but my best (and first) is one from Harbor Freight. I bought it and added a few things such as:

-para cord I wrapped around the handle

-gorilla tape I wrapped around the tube that goes in the handle

-fishing kit (lures, hooks, line, sinkers)

-sewing kit (this was already in it)

-water purification tablets

-cotton balls

-snare wire

-string

This knife is super tough and very well built for being 10 bucks. I would suggest looking at the reviews at Harbor Freights website.

This knife also has a compass but its junk and never has worked, but other than that its a great knife. It has a saw blade on the back and holds a nice sharp edge. The long blade I use for splitting wood by placing it on a piece of wood and hitting it with a stick.

The blade is too long for small work, so I also carry (these I carry everyday for normal use) a Leatherman surge and an old timer. I also carry a small sharpener.

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Doug Ritter RSK MK3

by Robert
(California)

I like the Doug Ritter RSK MK3 as a light-weight, fixed blade, utility knife. It works well for general camping chores and I have batoned it to cut fire wood. I am going to put an orange handle on it so I don’t loose it, again.

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Jungle king knife

by jaelen
(florida)

jungle king 1

jungle king 1

The best survival knife I have used is the jungle king knife, it come with pretty much everything you need to survive.

- Blade length: 155 mm.
- Handle length: 205 mm.
- Weight: 1000 gr.


It includes the following survival accessories:






* Fishing kit.
* Sewing kit.
* Scalpel.
* External applications.
* Nippers.
* Pencil.
* Compass.
* Magnesium pill.
* Pills capsule.
* SOS symbols.
* Signal mirror
* Ruler
* Latex tubes.
* Nylon cord.
* Forker pole.
* Multitool skinner knife.

- Stainless steel injected handle..
- X42 steel blade (INOX 46 CR13).
- 85 mm double saw
- Black chrome blade.
- It includes polycarbonate and fiber glass rigid case with sharpening stone and 8m of cord.


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Glock Feldmesser

by Chris
(US)

The Glock Feldmesser (field knife) is a wonderful knife that I use every time I fish or camp. It's a carbon steel knife, very tough, and gets the job done left and right.





The only problem I have with it is that it is difficult to apply a very sharp edge. Of course, this is a very thick knife. With effort you can apply a good edge on it.

At only $30 US I recommend it to anyone.


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Condor Nessmuk 4

by bobo
(northern california)

There's so many ways to skin this "ultimate survival knife" cat, but the best concept to me seems to be either a two-item combo or three-item combo. Both concepts include a small knife; then the remaining choices include some mix of medium knife, large knife, hatchet or saw.

My most efficient ultralight combo would be a small Victorinox folder, medium knife in a 4" condor nessmuk, then a Silky Pocketboy light folding saw, all three total weight under 1 lb.

The Nessmuk is fulltang, 1075 carbon steel, 1/8" thick, great for skinning/dressing game, and routine woodcrafting jobs. The saw safely cuts anything up to 8" thick, cuts only on the pull stroke to minimize hand hazards.

As an alternate to the saw, I'd bring a big knife, the Condor Hudson Bay 8 1/2", 16-oz, 1075 carbon, which can chop as well as do smaller jobs because it's easy to choke up on, and because it's essentially a 3/16" thick butcher knife on steroids, so it retains that utility-friendly feel of a kitchen knife.

If I absolutely positively HAD to carry ONLY ONE knife, it would be the big Hudson Bay, though I'd be hard pressed to imagine a scenario where I didn't also have my small victorinox folder on me. All four items together weight under 2 lbs. The cost of all four items combined -- $100 new in 2011.



Before you head for the backcountry.

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An alternative knife

by Norman
(Bulgaria )

If you do not have one of those all doing, all showing fancy survival knifes, a good second choice is, a good quality divers knife. I have a very strong stainless steel bladed knife, with rough rubber handle for grip, again blade goes all the way through!

It has saw edge one side with the blade which is about 9inches long. The case, being a divers knife is strong rubber with straps for your lower leg. Very robust and tough, if you get a good quality knife!

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Sami Knife

by Håkon
(Norway)

Sami knife

Sami knife

What I love about this knife is that it's extremely multipurpose. It can be used as an ordinary knife, but it can also be used as a small axe to cut small trees with. The blade is about 9-10 inch long and the shaft 6 inch.

If I could bring only one thing with me on a wilderness trip, I would take this knife.

Where I live the knife type is called "samekniv" (sami knife). The knife type has a long tradition in Norway, and it has been used when slaughtering reindeer. The knife on the picture is not mine, but it looks similar.

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Fox River Hunter

by Arjun
(Toronto, Canada)

Looks like this (except mine had hollow pins)

Looks like this (except mine had hollow pins)

The Bark River Knife & Tool Fox River Hunter knife is a full convex grind out of A2 tool steel. Easy to strop back to shaving sharpness and has good edge retention. Tough as nails, especially for one of it's size (just over 4 inches). This is a carbon steel blade.

The huge assortment of handle choices is merely a bonus (just be ready to shell out more cash for the more exotic handles). I picked up one with a basic Ivory Micarta handle.

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Overlander survival knife

by Stephen Swem
(Idaho)


I have been in combat and am an avid sportsman. The best survival knife I have used is not any of those Rambo knives but a knive made by TOPS called the overlander.

Tops makes many specialty knives for the military. The overlander is a 4" 1095 carbon steel blade that is 3/16" thick. It has a full tang that is exposed on the edges of the fabric phenolic handles.

The blade is more of kitchen utility style blade that is ideal for cooking chores (slicing procured food and skinning game) or equally ideal for intricate detail work ( such as carving wood tools and implements). The edge retention of this knife is really amazing.

I have baton chopped wood ( placing knife edge on wood and then striking the spine of the blade with another piece of wood) with no ill effect on the blade or the sharpness. It comes with a heat molded kydex sheath that really holds the knife securely. The belt clip is a little cheesy looking but functional as it swivels for various mounting variations.

I will also state that initially it was very hard to sharpen. At first I changed the grind angle on the blade to be compatible with my sharpener but once done, this knife has not been sharpened extensively. Go to topsknives.com for more details.

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Winchester hunting knife

by Tom Ritter
(Pennsylvania)

Personally my favorite survival knife is actually a 4-5 inch blade fix blade Winchester hunting knife. It performs well at almost every task and holds a really decent edge.

I have spent nearly 10 yrs in the bush honing my skills, keep in mind Im only 18 and I was about 8 when I got this knife and so far I have owned a wilderness explorer, a united bushmaster and a usmc k-bar and many more and this Winchester has been the best.

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Cheap but effective

by Raven
(Apocalypse U.S.A.)

I went to a military surplus store and couldn't pass up this knife. It was a big world war two looking bayonet for around 10 bucks. I didn't really have a use for it at first but its so tough and rugged that I don't know what i'd do without it now. Sure it's a little long but that's what hack saws are made for right?

So my advice is to look around, some of these old military knives are really tough.

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Buck knife

by Chris
(Spokane Valley, WA)

Buck 119 Special

Buck 119 Special

I received my knife as a junior high graduation gift. It's a tradition in my family that you get a knife upon moving up to high school. I've had my knife know for ten years, and I couldn't be happier.





I used to carry a Gerber multi-tool, Victorinox Tinker, and my Buck 119 Special. I found over the years that the only knife I actually ended up using was the Buck, so now that's all I carry. Just large enough to hack away limbs and cut logs for a shelter, it's also small enough to clean fish.


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The Buck Packlilte Project

by DarylD
(Atlanta, Georgia)

Buck Packlight

Buck Packlight

I found the Buck Paklite Skinner at Wally World today and thought I take it for a spin. I am not a big fan of all metal, minimalist-designed knives, which is one reason I almost passed this knife up. I figured that for less than $20 I could find some use for it, even if it was only to throw in the glove box of "Muley", my S10 Blazer.

I am a sucker for personal edged devices. I have several in the BOB and survival box but cannot pass up an opportunity to try something different. This one, I felt, was thin enough to fit in between my poncho and work gloves just to fit a niche as a low-cost but dependable cutting utensil.






There are actually two versions of this knife; The Buck PakLite TM Skinner Knife (Silver, 6 5/8-Inch) and the Buck PakLite TM Caper Knife with Black Traction Coat (Black/Silver, 6 3/4-Inch) that might interest you. The latter is the version that I bought. The knife's edge is sharp from the factory. Although it should handle normal cutting chores if called upon, using a good Smith's sharpening system will keep the blade extremely sharp.

This is not a defensive use knife. It is a utility tool and that is about it. In addition, if you need just a bare bone cutting utensil, the Buck Paklite Skinner will service the purpose.

Weighing in at 1 pound, the knife has the following features:
• 2-7/8" Skinning Blade, 420HC Stainless Steel
• 420HC Stainless Steel Handle with Black Traction Coating
• Comes with a heavy-duty nylon sheath (has plastic insert).
• As always, includes Buck's Forever Warranty.

While I do not expect to be skinning much of anything, I do like the up-sweep style of a skinning blade.

The knife handle, although quite thin, fits the hand well with the thumb placed on the choil or when placing the thumb in the "Tang" hole (for lack of a better description) and the forefinger is placed on top of the blade. I found that I could make some very small cuts using the latter method as it gave me better control over the blade.

My only complaint about the knife is the grip. It is thin and slippery when wet or when the cutting hand is moist, which could lead to serious injury for the user if the hand slipped past the grip and onto the blade. To remedy that, and to give myself something that would provide a better additional gripping surface, I added several layers of Plasti Dip while following the manufactures recommended procedure.

Plasti Dip is a multi-purpose air dry, synthetic rubber coating. It applies easily by spraying, brushing or dipping. Plasti Dip protective coating products resist moisture, acids, abrasion, corrosion, skidding/slipping, and provides a comfortable, controlled grip. It remains flexible, stretchy and will not become brittle or crack in extreme weather conditions; -30°F to 200°F. Available in 7.25-oz Can, 11-oz Aerosol, 14.5-oz Can. (http://www.plastidip.com/home_solutions/Plasti_Dip).

I have had a can of Plasti Dip for quite a few years and have coated pliers, crescent wrenches, and other tools. The color will help me from losing sight of the knife if I drop it or lay it down, as well.

Shown in the picture, is the Buck Packlite with the "new" plastic-coated handle.

There is a plastic liner inside the sheath that holds the knife in place and that also prevents the sharp edge from cutting the sheath's material. Because of the additional width of the handle caused by the dipping process, the handle did not want to rest completely in its groove as it did before the dipping. The answer was to either widen the groove or remove it completely. I opted for the latter.

Some quick surgery with a razor knife removed the handle groove on the liner and the knife rested comfortably in place. The sheath material actually hugs the handle of the knife better and makes for a flatter profile.

Note_01: Since I was not planning to add a lanyard of some type, I did not cut for the lanyard hole but may if need be.

Note_02: I had seen a video of someone who wrapped the handle with paracord, which adds to the usefulness of the knife. However, there was no mention that the handle would no longer fit the sheath liner.

The Buck Packlite is a useful addition to your survival pack, bag, or box. The minor changes that I made to it and the sheath gives me a better and more secure grip when it is wet.

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Bratstvo knife

by Bruno Islas
(México D.F.)


I have a Yugoslavian knife. I think it was used by soldiers. It is marked with the legend: "440 bratstvo", and has a serrated edge and a compartment with a capsule with a mini survival kit.

I think it is good. Could anyone tell me please something about this knife? Thank you


Prepare for your wilderness adventure.

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