Survival vest

by Phyllis
(New Jersey shore)

One thing about survival kits that always bothered me was the possibility of losing them if you take a good fall. So, I bought a fly-fishing vest, which has enough pockets to make sure I can wear my supplies.

It has 10 zippered pockets and secure loops to hang items from. And a shallow pouch on the back for larger flat items, a lightweight plastic tarp or dropcloth, rain poncho and a couple of pieces of aluminum flashing I use as a pot stand or even a rudimentary hobo stove that 'slit-fits' together. And one construction grade trash bag that really works well as a ground cloth for keeping you dry and keeping 'stuff' you're bedding down on or sitting on from poking through.

I have 2 space blankets, paracord, 4 altoids tins: first aid kit, survival kit, survival food tabs, Water purification.

Each is in its own pocket, so they don't add a lot of bulk. Other pockets hold firestarting gear, mess kit, knife, flashlights (really powerful 1-led 'flat-light' keychains that stay on when activated, freeing your hands) I've attached several: to the zipper pull and a couple of the loop hangers.

Also, duct tape, electrical tape, zip ties, folding saw, wire and more. The whole thing weighs about 3 pounds when loaded. But usually, I go out with it weighing around 2 pounds.

I like to go into the woods in Maine to take photographs and do some painting. The vest allows me to take a lot of survival gear without having extra pieces to carry along and possible lose.

Click here to read or post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Survival kit tips and advice.

Survival vest

by James
(Hephzibah GA, USA)

As far as a kit goes, I don't use one of the little dinky things they call hip pouch survival kits. I use the clothing I will be wearing outside in the wilderness... The skills you learn either through didactic learning or hands on tinkering are your best tools. However, other items can help.

The first and foremost is a good knife, and I don't mean one of those rambo style hollow handle monstrosities, or one of the little crap claw splitters that green bellies are carrying these days. A good hand made knife can be made from the simplest of materials and can be had at little or no cost other than your own devotion to making things by hand.






I wear a vest made from heavy grade canvas, my vest has netting stitched to it so that I can a attach hemp twine in a gillie suit fashion for hunting, and it also has several... lots and lots of pockets. In my vest, I have: a fishing kit, a thermal blanket, a large amount of 550 cord, a small suture kit, some first aid items, a small shovel/ pickaxe combo that breaks down to two pieces, some fire starter, a ferro rod, some snares and extra snare wire, a hand made frog spear for fishing and spearing small animals, a wire saw, a smaller knife, a whistle, a pair of binoculars and some spare ammo for my 22lr pistol that goes with me everywhere, a compass and a small lithium led button light.

Also in my hat I have a fishing kit, a small hacksaw blade knife, some snare wire and a small lighter. In my pockets, I carry some other things, such as toe warmers, a pair of gloves, a few small snacks and a cell phone. This kit has more than enough to let me rest comfortably if I get lost while I await rescue.

I also have a small pack that goes with me into the great outdoors. In that I can carry all manner of things that will help me get through the long lonely hours If I am ever lost. This, however is my style of go gettum. Other people may not enjoy having the extra weight, but as far as I can say I have never tired more quickly by adding the few extra pounds of gear that my entire kit weighs. I even carry six liters of fresh clean water, that way I can stay hydrated longer.

Click here to read or post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Survival kit tips and advice.