Wilderness shelter

by Dan
(US)

Tree as shelter

Tree as shelter

Dig under large trees near the root dig until you can get in side the root. If the tree is dead chip out the bottom to gain headroom.


Start to prepare your trip before you head for the trails!


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Tree Stump Shelter

by Thomas
(Canada)

1. Find an uprooted tree
2. Make sure that the hole where the tree used to be is dry.
3. Find sticks and lean them against the uprooted tree roots.
4. Use thick sticks first, then thin sticks to fill in the gaps.
5. Collect leaves, weeds, leafy branches, anything you can find.

Site Build It!OPTIONAL AND NOT TESTED: with your leaves, create a 6 in layer (13cm) layer, and then shovel dirt onto leaves, create another layer of leaves (6 in).

6. Create a 12 in (30cm) layer of debris on top of your frame.

Sleep!

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Warm Wind Proof Shelter

by Abbie
(Roswell, Ga, U.S.)

Build support by putting large tree limbs around a tree, and put smaller twigs on the larger sticks. Coat heavily with leaves. Put large sticks over the leaves to secure them...this is best in the fall or winter.

I made this in the Georgia Mountains, and was very warm and kept wind out. If you find a door-like piece of wood, it is perfect for a door! (It keeps animals out if you leave the shelter.)

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Deterring Ants

by Tim"NOMAD"Piper
(Louisville,KY&THE ROAD)


A friend and I discovered one day while eating lunch that ants travel on a sent trail. At least between the nest and food source. We confused them by putting a line of charred cigarette ashes across their trail. The ants searched until they finally found a way around it.

If a person had fire and a small enough shelter they could burn a ring around it and spread the ashes from the fire to deter ants.

Pryor to building your shelter a person could do a small controlled burn to kill off insects and deter their return.

If you are in an open hammock I believe you could ring the tree above and below the attachment lines with charcoal to keep ants off you.


"SAFE JOURNEY'S"

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How to build a shelter if trapped in wilderness

by Sam
(Canada)

Spruce

Spruce

You can usually find a good lean-to site at the base of a tall spruce with large overhanging boughs. The ground near the base of the spruce is often spongy, drier in rain or freer of snow in the winter.

Place spruce boughs over the poles in an emergency, otherwise use plastic or tarps. There should be one step from bed to fire. There should be two trees to hold up the ridgepole which is tied onto the two trees. The ridgepole holds up branches that make a wall. The ridgepole should be shoulder high off the ground.

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Transom knot

by Ioan Powell
(Cardiff)

Warm but Windy ring shelter

Warm but Windy ring shelter

Depending on how big your shelter is going to be, sharpen strong sticks and spear them into the ground. I used 6 for a 5 man shelter. Then lash 3 thinner sticks branch to branch across and lash together using the transom knot (see picture).





Lay hay on first level. Then snap bracken and use for 3rd and 4th layers.

Lay hay and leaves on floor.

Lay sticks as a roof and then chuck leaves and bracken and moss on the sticks.

Lie down with friends and build fire.

HAPPY CAMPING :)

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Weather Proof shelters

by Taylor
(Canada)

Make sure your shelter is weather proof. Rain, Snow, Wind and others. Your shelter must be sturdy and thick.

To test your shelter wiggle if and move it around if possible. Go inside of your shelter and look up. If your see light and holes get more leaves, grass, branches or what ever you used.

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How to Keep Dry Inside a Wooden Shelter During Rain

by Trevor Papineau
(Galt, CA, US)

Having air in a shelter is important, but keeping out rain is also important. One way you can still have air and keep dry is simple:

Dirt+Water+Shelter=:-).

Put dirt in the small cracks in your shelter. Then pour a little bit of water on the dirt and then pack it down with your hand. Good Luck and stay dry ;-)


Before you head for the backcountry.

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