Winter survival car kit

by Phillip
(Colorado)

Very good article. I would just add a few things to the survival kit: Extra pair of glasses, extra pair of sunglasses in unbreakable case. fire starter paste or liquid.

A 22 pistol with ammo. Both for animals and man if necessary.

Water proof note pad and pen or permanet marker
waterproof to leave a note if it be comes necessary to leave your vehicle.

Route maker tape or ribbon to mark a last direction trail.

Small jar of vasoline for wind burn and chapped lips and as fuel to start a fire. Plastic gas can and basic car parts, drive belt,hoses.

Pick the right car emergency kit

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Winter survival gears for your car

by Theora55
(Maine)

A jar with candy and chocolates serves as emergency food. The candy is leftover from Easter, and it would take an emergency for it to get eaten. Another jar has a bunch of tea light candles. The jar can serve as a candle holder, and a candle adds light, warmth and cheer. Be sure to use a candle holder, as many parts of your car interior are flammable. Don't forget matches.

I keep a fleece blanket, mylar space blankets and a light sleeping bag in my car. If I were stranded, I wouldn't be cozy, but I wouldn't freeze, either.

Soda pop is under pressure, so it doesn't freeze as fast as still water, so a couple bottles of soda are in the car. Spare hat, mittens, wool socks and a fleece pullover. Cell phone charger.

I have a set of traction mats, kitty litter or sand, and a small shovel. Everything except the shovel fits in a re-purposed kitty litter bucket. And a book. The likely scenario for me is getting stuck in bad weather with no houses nearby, or stuck in a pileup. I've used the traction mats to help other drivers get unstuck.

I often have my dog in the car, so I'll have to add a container of dog food. He'd help me stay warm.

In the winter in Maine, taking care of the car and learning to handle snow and ice is the best safety plan.

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Sterno fire starters

Sterno & Wax Wick Fire Starters(instant heat to stay warm)

Sterno & Wax Wick Fire Starters(instant heat to stay warm)

Sterno lights starts very quickly and can warm your hands in seconds - so you can move on to more important things. It also heats soup reasonably quickly to give you internal warmth and energy.



Candle wick fire starters as well as flint strike fire starters w/starter sticks. Heaters -Propane and Naptha Small Bow Saw for cutting firewood and Hand and Foot warmers for when you venture off to collect firewood. To get instant heat will prevent you from succumbing to the elements and a nourishing meal will keep you healthier.

A rechargeable spotlight (1 million candle power or more) can be used for safety. If wolves or bear approach - hit them with the spotlight - and they will never bother you again. Try to spot the alpha and shine her for 1 1/2 minutes. She will wimper and cry and the pack will leave you alone. Don't use it as a flashlight - only as a safety to signal, defend or quick spot for tree rows etc.

Use your lantern flashlights for regular lighting needs. Couple spare batteries and you will have a much more comfortable time in the dark. Naptha Lanterns are great to have as well - they radiate heat and last a few hours before needing to be refilled. Follow this advise and don't even feel the cold - even in sub-zero f.

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Tasteless and odorless

by S.J.
(TO,Ca,USA)

Warning Warning Warning

Warning Warning Warning

Take care when using fire in a closed space such as your car. Even a candle will use up your oxygen in a rapid manor. Be advised, carbon monoxide is both tasteless and odorless, and must be respected.

On a side note, an item to add to your kit is disposable hand warmers. They give off a surprising amount of heat, and add a substantial amount of comfort. If you haven't used them before you don't know what you are missing.

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Winter car safety tip

by Deborah
(Canada)

Perhaps it is understood, but when you are awaiting the arrival of assistance, keep one of the door's free of the snow for the sake of visibility and as an exit. Depending on how deep the snow gets, you could have a hard time getting out. Plan for it.

On the lee-side of the vehicle (out of the wind) where you have cracked your window 1/2 inch for ventilation, clear the snow with that shovel from your kit.

You'll need to find a balance between keeping the heat in the car and keeping your flares visible and your door clear.

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Kitty litter

by Jean
(United States)

I wanted to share an ingredient for your winter car kit: kitty litter is invaluable in an icy situation where your tires are just spinning and spinning.

Many times I would have been stranded until someone came along if I didn't have this traction-producing device in my trunk. I don't know if it's exactly wilderness, but it surely is helpful in Northern Michigan!

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Advice about a winter survival kit

by Deborah
(Canada)

On all the sites giving advice about a winter survival kit, no one has mentioned something very basic and very important -- toilet paper! Toilet paper and a pee bucket with a lid of some kind.

If you are holing up in your car, trying to stay warm, you need to decrease the number of times you open the door and let the heat out. You also want to limit your exposure which is more of an issue for the ladies. So, a pee bucket is important to be used inside the car if you can wrangle the room.

An empty 2L plastic ice cream container is perfect. When preparing your winter kit, you can store the toilet paper in ice cream container, with a plastic bag and hand wipes or hand sanitizer. When "deployed", ladies should keep the urine paper-free so the urine can be tossed outside at a safe distance from anything during some other outdoor task. The used paper goes in the plastic bag, tucked away from consumables as is the pee bucket. Use that hand sanitizer afterwards!

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Build a car kit

by Paul
(United States)

After being stranded in a car for 18 hrs in the Buffalo, NY winter I have a car kit with me at all times. Including:

Extra pants,shirts, long undies top and bottom, boots, socks, jacket, winter gloves& hats, flashlight with many spare batteries, battery radio(AM/FM/CB), sleeping bag, pillow, emergency blanket, toilet paper, candles, matches, lighter, trash bags, bottled water, hand sanitizer, granola bars, rope, duct tape, swiss army knife, compass, signal mirror, signal whistle, snap light stick, hand warmer pads, empty coffee can w/lid, tooth brush/paste, asprin, imodium, band aids, gauze pads, medical tape, deoderant and a deck of playing cards.

I keep most of this in a five gallon plastic bucket with lid. I took the approach as the vehicle is only a shelter and I will need to survive in it for a long time with only what I have with me.

Pick the right car emergency kit

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