Comments for Rob Rucci Handmade Knives

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Info. on knife
by: Ron Moss

I like the looks of your knife( 6 inch blade is ideal for a wilderness knife) and I would like more information on this particular knife. Please email me at jronaldmoss@gmail.com.I look forward to hearing from you.

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Love your work
by: Terry

Hi Rob,
Do you sell your knives?
T

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Heat treating A2
by: Rob Rucci

Hi Rob,
Thanks for the question. A2 is an air hardening steel, so water or oil quenching isn't the ideal method for it. To be more specific on my process, I heat treat the A2 at a very high temp. to harden it initially, (which also makes it very brittle). Then, after air cooling, I heat it at a much lower temp. (400 degrees) and slowly draw the metal back. When it's all through, the steel ends up at Rockwell 58-60, which is, in my opinion, the ideal combination of hardness, strength, durability and edge holding, while still being able to take an edge easily on a whetstone. I hope this answered your question. By the way, I LOVE YOUR SITE!! Some great info. on there.
Rob

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Additionals
by: Rob

Would it add anything to the blade if you heated it up to partial solution annealing, then water cooled, then got it up to partial/full solution and let it air cool for strength and sharpening capabilities or does the A2 steel come to you already annealed and tempered?

-Rob
http://wildcraft.gaelicmysts.com

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How I made them
by: Rob Rucci

Hi Guys,
Thanks for your comments. I didn't think about anyone wanting to know how I made them, but here goes: By the way, I have three designs I've created and use. "The Survivor" which is pictured, "The Skinner", which is of course a skinning knife, and "The Woodsman", which is a smaller general purpose knife. The Survivor takes me about 16 hours from scratch which includes a custom leather sheath. I cut the initial shape out of A2 flat stock steel with a hand grinder. Next I smooth the edges with a belt sander and dremmel tool. I then grind my blade/bevel freehand with a large belt sander 6"X48" belt. This is the hardest part to do well, but gets easier with practice. Next, I grind the knurling into the spine freehand with a bench grinder. Then, I cut out my handles with a coping saw (hand saw) and make sure I cut them wider than the tang to allow for sanding later. I then clamp everything together and drill the holes for the handle pins. Next, I cook the steel in a heat treat oven to Rockwell 58-60 (for a small fee, there are many places that will do this for you). Then, I apoxy the handles and pins(which I cut from 1/4" stainless steel rods), together and clamp until dry. Next is final shaping/sanding of handle/pins/tang on the belt sander, then palm sander, then hand sanding all the way down to 600 grit. Finally, I apply several coats of urethane, etch the owners name in the blade and onto the sheath making. I hope this wasn't too much or too boring I tried to just hit the highlights with out too much detail. I'm happy to provide any other info. if anyone wants to know. Thanks again!

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GOOD LOOKING KNIFE
by: STEVE

GOOD LOOKING KNIFE,BUT,WHERE ARE THE DETAILS OF HOW U ASSEMBLED THE KNIFE.

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Woah
by: Chris

Your combination of steel and wood is beautiful. Ingenious idea to extend the tang as well. How many hours does a project like this require?

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